Literature

POETRY  / THEATRE

 

LITERATURE

 

Shylock and History by Jami Rogers

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/merchant/ei_shylock.html

 

Towering over Shakespeare's romantic comedy The Merchant of Venice is the tragic figure of Shylock. Before we can begin to understand Shylock, though, we must understand the historical and dramatic influences under which Shakespeare wrote.

Although Shakespeare wrote possibly the most famous Jew in English literature, there were virtually no Jews in England during his lifetime. It isn't known whether Shakespeare would have come into contact with anyone who was Jewish. It would also be impossible to surmise how detailed his knowledge of the historical facts about Jews in England was, but fact and myth were certainly handed down through the ages, and it is safe to assume that he would have been aware of his country's historical folklore.

Pegado de <http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/masterpiece/merchant/ei_shylock.html>

 

 

  Ancient Poems, Ballads and Songs of England by Robert Bell

He who, in travelling through the rural districts of England, has made the road-side inn his resting-place, who has visited the lowly dwellings of the villagers and yeomanry, and been present at their feasts and festivals, must have observed that there are certain old poems, ballads, and songs, which are favourites with the masses, and have been said and sung from generation to generation.

 

 The Autobiography of Charles Darwin

Edited by his Son, Francis Darwin
My father's autobiographical recollections, given in the present chapter, were written for his children,--and written without any thought that they would ever be published. To many this may seem an impossibility; but those who knew my father will understand how it was not only possible, but natural.

 

 Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.
Everything was in confusion in the Oblonskys' house. The wife had discovered that the husband was carrying on an intrigue with a French girl, who had been a governess in their family, and she had announced to her husband that she could not go on living in the same house with him.

 

 The Antiquary, Complete by Sir Walter Scott

The present work completes a series of fictitious narratives, intended to illustrate the manners of Scotland at three different periods. _Waverley_embraced the age of our fathers, _Guy Mannering_ that of our own youth, and the _Antiquary_ refers to the last ten years of the eighteenth century. I have, in the two last narratives especially, sought my principal personages in the class of society who are the last to feel the influence of that general polish which assimilates to each other the manners of different nations

 

 The Arabian Nights Entertainments Complete by Anon.

The exact origin of the Tales, which appear in the Arabic as "The Thousand and One Nights," is unknown. The Caliph Haroon al Rusheed, who, figures in so lifelike a manner in many of the stories, was a contemporary of the Emperor Charlemagne, and there is internal evidence that the collection was made in the Arabic language about the end of the tenth century.
 

 The Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini by Benvenuto Cellini

AMONG the vast number of men who have thought fit to write down the history of their own lives, three or four have achieved masterpieces which stand out preeminently: Saint Augustine in his “Confessions,” Samuel Pepys in his “Diary,” Rousseau in his “Confessions.” It is among these extraordinary documents, and unsurpassed by any of them, that the autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini takes its place.

 

William Henry Hudson 

   http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/William_Henry_Hudson (en Inglés)

Hispanic American Center for Economic Research - A revival of Argentina's Thoreau

http://www.hacer.org/current/ARG221.php

      If Reuben Ravera has his way, one day his museum will be a destination for culture tourists, like the Café Tortoni, jammed these days with Americans, Europeans, and Japanese eager to be in a place where the great Jorge Luis Borges hung his hat.

Mr. Ravera's task is as hard as rocks. Unlike Borges, whose fame seems brighter today than when he was alive, the name William Henry Hudson doesn't sit on the lips of the literati, local or foreign.

Words Wthout Borders: With Borges  by Alberto Manguel

[Borges] loved the German language. He taught it to himself at the age of seventeen in Switzerland, during the long nights of curfew imposed by the war, reading his way through the poems of Heine. "Once you know the meaning of Nachtigall, Liebe, Herz, you can read Heine without the help of a dictionary," he said. And he enjoyed the possibilities German allowed of making up words, as Goethe's Nebelglanz, "the glimmer of the fog." He would let the words resound in the room: "Füllest wieder Busch und Thal still mit Nebelglanz *€¦." He praised the transparency of the language, and he reproached Heidegger for having invented what he called "an incomprehensible dialect of German."

 

The William Blake Archive

  "A free site on the World Wide Web since 1996, the Blake Archive was conceived as an international public resource that would provide  unified access to major works of visual and literary art that are  highly disparate, widely dispersed, and more and more often severely  restricted as a result of their value, rarity, and extreme fragility. > A growing number of contributors, currently eight American and British  institutions and a major private collector, have given the Archive  permission to include thousands of Blake's images and texts without  fees. At this writing the Archive contains fully searchable and  scalable electronic editions of 27 copies of 16 of Blake's 19  illuminated works in the context of full, up-to-date bibliographic  information about each image, scrupulous "diplomatic" transcriptions  of all texts, detailed descriptions of all images, and extensive  bibliographies."
 

Victor Hugo:  Literary Quotations

  VICTOR HUGO QUOTES

     The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (1831)

        "During a wise man's whole life, his destiny holds his philosophy in a state of siege."

 

The Aesthetics of Decay, by Dylan Trigg

 

 

In The Aesthetics of Decay, Dylan Trigg confronts the remnants from the fallout of post-industrialism and postmodernism. Through a considered analysis of memory, place, and nostalgia, Trigg argues that the decline of reason enables a critique of progress to emerge. In this ambitious work, Trigg aims to reassess the direction of progress by situating it in a spatial context. In doing so, he applies his critique of rationality to modern ruins. The derelict factory, abandoned asylum, and urban alleyway all become allies in Trigg's attack on a fixed image of temporality and progress. The Aesthetics of Decay offers a model of post-rational aesthetics in which spatial order is challenged by an affirmative ethics of ruin.

 

 

 

 

 

Schopenhauer and the sublime  Pleasure of Tragedy, by Dylan Trigg

   Volume 28, Number 1, April 2004, E-ISSN: 1086-329X Print ISSN: 0190-0013

   DOI: 10.1353/phl.2004.0018

  

More about Trigg:  Selected Essays

"The Place of Trauma: Memory, Hauntings, and the Temporality of Ruins" in Memory Studies, Vol. 2, Issue: 1, 2009
"Place Becomes the Law" in Griffith Law Review, Vol. 17, Issue: 2, 2008

"Altered Place: Nostalgia, Topophobia, and the Unreality of Memory" in Journal for the Society of Existential Analysis, Vol. 18, Issue: 1, 2008.
"Furniture Music, Hotel Lobbies, and Banality: Can we Speak of a Disinterested Space?" in Space and Culture, Vol. 9: Issue 4, 2006
"Memories in Site: Towards a Renewed Understanding of Starbucks" in Environmental and Architectural Phenomenology,  Vol. 17: Issue 1, 2006
"The Everyday Uncanny: Cezanne and Merleau-Ponty on Art" in Naked Punch Vol. 1: Issue 4, 2005
"Ambiguous Boundaries: Cane Hill and the Resistance of Space" for Architecture Week, 2005
"
From the Divine to the Dissolute: Schopenhauer and Death in Venice" in Consciousness, Literature and the Arts, Vol. 5: Issue, 1, 2004
"Hegel and the Pathway to Despair" in Meteorite, Vol.1, Issue 4, 2004

George Orwell: Social Criticism in Literature

   

                                       

 

    Orwell: Animal Farm       

   Timothy Garton Ash
        ‘Why should we still read George Orwell on politics? Until 1989, the answer was plain. He was the writer who captured the essence of totalitarianism. All over communist-ruled Europe, people would show me their dog-eared, samizdat copies of Animal Farm or Nineteen Eighty-Four and ask: ‘How did he know?’...’
 

 

 

Keats

               

                          

 

   

 

 

   Keats and Pope:The Rape of Lock and The Eve of St. Agnes.

    

 

 

 

 

Flaubert and Tolstoy: Madame Bovary and Anna Carenina

 

Literature - a Mirror of Society

The literature of a country is affected and influenced by how the people of that country live.  This paper will prove that

The French Revolution greatly influenced 19th Century French Romanticism.

Influence of Realism in Literature

Role of the Queen in Beowulf and Grendel

 

Borges

               

Borges: A lecture by Carlos Fuentes

        18 October 1999, 92nd Street Y, New York, Unterberg Poetry Center         

   

Words Wthout Borders: With Borges  by Alberto Manguel

[Borges] loved the German language. He taught it to himself at the age of seventeen in Switzerland, during the long nights of curfew imposed by the war, reading his way through the poems of Heine. "Once you know the meaning of Nachtigall, Liebe, Herz, you can read Heine without the help of a dictionary," he said. And he enjoyed the possibilities German allowed of making up words, as Goethe's Nebelglanz, "the glimmer of the fog." He would let the words resound in the room: "Füllest wieder Busch und Thal still mit Nebelglanz *€¦." He praised the transparency of the language, and he reproached Heidegger for having invented what he called "an incomprehensible dialect of German."

 

Pio Baroja (Spanish)


               

 

Shakespeare

         The Complete Works of William Shakespeare

         The Merchant of Venice (full text)

Whitman

         Whitman+Vaughan Williams

            Behold ! The Symphony itself . . ., by jean couture, March 26, 2002

It is interesting that this English composer seems to so deeply understand the poetry of Walt Whitman. [...] The music flows from the rhythm inherent in the language." Incidentally, in the same tone is the poem `A Clear Midnight' - excerpt from `Leaves of Grass' (1900)

Coleridge

 

                               

 

        TEXTO Y PAISAJE EN “THIS LIME-TREE BOWER MY PRISON” DE S.T. COLERIDGE by María Calviño

             http://www.uca.edu.ar/esp/sec-ffilosofia/esp/docs-institutos/lit-inglesa/01-calvino.pdf

        Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina

            Facultad de Filosofía y Letras

                 Instituto de Literatura Inglesa y Norteamericana

                        RESÚMENES de Cuadernos de Literatura Inglesa y Norteamericana 

María Calviño goes over one of the most well-known poems of Coleridge. The article was edited  in "Cuadernos de Literatura Inglesa y Norteamericana".  María Calviño is PH en Letras (Universidad nacional de Córdoba, Argentina and professor of "Literaturas de habla inglesa" in the Facultad de Humanidades in the same university.

 

        Lake District: 79 photos

 

                       

                                                   View

   

Lord Byron

        The life and work of Lord Byron

 

                                   

John Steinbeck

 

                   

        Steinbeck: "On Teaching"

            The Grapes of Wrath

 

Cervantes, a brief biography

 

                                      

    

   Faulkner

        (Copy of the acceptance award by American author William Faulkner for the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950)


                           

    Manet, Cezanne, and Picasso and  works by Cather, Joyce, and Faulkner

        REDUCERE IN PACE

        In the wings , musing on music & performance, by Heather Heise

 

 

John Dos Passos

 

Dostoiesky

 

    Julio Cortazar  (English)

        Julio Cortázar  (Spanish)

 

               

          

 

 

 Rayuela, Capítulo 7 (Read by Cortázar, Spanish)

            Cortázar y Gaudi (Spanish) 

            

 

   

Carlos Fuentes

               

    García Lorca     (English)

        García Lorca     (Spanish)

 

    Pablo Neruda

    Octavio Paz

 

 Miguel de Unamuno

 The sepulchre of Don Quixote

           

 

         Miguel de Unamuno (audio)

 

    Camilo José Cela (Spanish)

 

 

     Thouthands of FULL-TEXT free Books!

 

 

    Literature of Travelling and Exploration

 

Doris Lessing

 

    Winner of the 2007 Nobel Prize for Literature

 

 

           

 


 

Walter Scott

   The Abbot by Sir Walter Scott (Full text)

 

Carlo Lorenzini

   The Adventures of Pinocchio by C. Collodi [Pseudonym of Carlo Lorenzini] (Full text)

 

The Advancement of  Learning, By Francis Bacon (Full text)

    Bacon makes, by a sort of exhaustive analysis, a ground-plan of all subjects of study, as an intellectual map, helping the right inquirer in his search for the right path. The right path is that by which he has the best chance of adding to the stock of knowledge in the world something worth labouring for; and the true worth is in labour for "the glory of the Creator and the relief of man's estate." Sir Francis Bacon (essays)

 

Fables and short stories
   
Aesop´s Fables

    The Stones, by Murray Schafer (Short story)

         R. Murray Schafer is a Canadian composer and author of the seminal The Tuning of The World (1977), a history of sound in the environment. One of his major professional interests is listening education. His essay describes “an exercise I do quite regularly with classes to train them in observation. It works well in countries with languages I don’t know because I don’t have to use many words to set it up or run it. In fact, the fewer words the better.” Address: R.R.2, Indian River, Ontario K0L 2B0. © 2004 R. Murray Schafer, including drawings.

 

 

Full Books

 

John T. Morse

Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens)

Jules Verne

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

John Payne

 

          Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp by John Payne

 

G. K. Chesterton

 

          Alarms and Discursions by G. K. Chesterton

 

Xenophon

 

          Agesilaus by Xenophon

          Anabasis by Xenophon

          The Apology by Xenophon

 

Plato

 

          Alcibiades I by Plato (see Appendix I)

          Apology Also known as The Death of Socrates by Plato

Seneca

 

          Apocolocyntosis by Lucius Seneca

 

Henry James

 

          The Aspern Papers, by Henry James

          The Altar of the Dead by Henry James

          The Ambassadors by Henry James

 

 

John Milton

 

           Areopagitica by John Milton

 

Joseph Conrad

 

           The Arrow of Gold by Joseph Conrad

 

William Shakespeare

 

           All's Well, that Ends Well by William Shakespeare

           Antony and Cleopatra by William Shakespeare [Collins edition]

 

 

 

Educational Gazette

 

The Educational Gazette(EG) is a collaborative, computer-supported House Organ journal published by EMTF. In order to support the process of collaborative work, contributors  with different backgrounds and living in different regions of the world are welcome.

Contributions to EG focus on essays, reviews, debates and interviews about educational issues and their related subjects. It is aimed at keen or studious readers all over the world. Contributions made by representatives of the various fields of knowledge are welcome.

        Contact us: ctrevisi@trevisifoundation.com